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Vote

Multiple subtitle files

description

"Upload clips with subtitles (in a language available and of the teacher's choosing) and get students to add another set of subtitles in another language
In Belgium movies are available in 2 languages, simultaneously.
This would be an advantage for translation students and perhaps also for students at lower levels of proficiency in the foreign language. It might help to see a written text (L1) and to then supply the subtitles in the L2. Could also be beneficial for students learning 2 foreign languages..."

To support such scenaria a dialog would be needed:
  • to turn on-off subtitles sets,
  • remove them,
  • import/export them
  • with a label for each one
question is which actions should be available at non-authoring mode

comments

Birbilis wrote Dec 7, 2011 at 11:21 PM

Also, the player's subtitles are should be of enough size to show all selected sets one below the other (the dialog mentioned above should also allow moving subtitle sets up/down in order), or allow the subtitles area to be detached out of the video window (to not cover all the video when there are many subtitle sets selected). Would be nice to see a picture from Belgian TV on how they pull this off with 4 (?) lines of subtitles (2 for each of the 2 languages they show)

Birbilis wrote Dec 7, 2011 at 11:22 PM

Another question is how the two sets would be separated visually, via some separator or via other formatting/color for each set?

Birbilis wrote Oct 3, 2012 at 7:26 AM

Another solution could be to have multiple subtitle regions on the player, each one connected to different subtitle grids

Birbilis wrote Oct 3, 2012 at 7:46 AM

question is how are multiple caption lines displayed on Belgian TV or at other countries/channels that do the same.

Are 4 rows (2 for each language) shown?
Are they all at the bottom of the display?
Are they all close together, or grouped in two pairs?

It would be nice to have a screenshot

Birbilis wrote Oct 3, 2012 at 11:59 AM

Update from Stavroula Sokoli on this:
"Bilingual subtitles only allow one line per language.
This means that you always see two lines, the top one e.g. in Flemish, the bottom in French."

ClipFlair wrote Oct 3, 2012 at 3:16 PM

follow-up from Stavroula:
"Regarding my comment: 'Bilingual subtitles only allow one line per language.'
This is what happens in bilingual countries. We might want something like the option you get with DVD players, where you can display two languages, one at the top of the screen and the other at the bottom. This means that you may get four lines at once, which may cover a lot of the screen but it's for learning purposes and you can select and de-select them."

ClipFlair wrote Oct 3, 2012 at 3:18 PM

Comment from Jorge:

"Bilingual subtitles:

Actually, in some countries you do get 4 lines(2 French + 2 Flemish, for instance) at the bottom of the screen. But that's a minor issue.

I think bilingual subtitles have lots of potential for language learning and we should consider them, particularly when dealing with lesser used languages. Also, you could have two lines on the top with Chinese ideograms and 2 lines at the bottom with pinyin, for instance."